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Haskins Laboratories Status Report: SR-37/38 (1974)
1 January - 30 June 1974
The following articles are in PDF format. To download the document, click on its title. See the Status Report Archive page for additional information.
SR-37/38: Contents
  TITLE PAGE  
  ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I.

Manuscripts and Extended Reports

  Alvin M. Liberman. The Role of Speech in Language: Introduction to the Conference.
1
  Ignatius G. Mattingly. The Human Aspect of Speech.

5

  Michael Studdert-Kennedy. From Continuous Signal to Discrete Message: Syllable to Phoneme.
13
  Philip Lieberman. The Evolution of Speech and Language.
25
  James E. Cutting and Peter D. Eimas. Phonetic Feature Analyzers and the Processing of Speech in Infants.
45
  Diane Kewley-Port. An Experimental Evaluation of the EMG Data Processing System: Time Constant Choice for Digital Integration.
65
  Fredericka Bell-Berti and Katherine S. Harris. More on the Motor Organization of Speech Gestures
73
  T. Ushijima and H. Hirose. Electromyographic Study of the Velum During Speech.
79
  Hakime Hirose and Tatsujiro Ushijima. The Function of the Posterior Cricoarytenoid in Speech Articulation

99

  Frances J. Freeman and Tatsujiro Ushijima. Laryngeal Activity Accompanying the Moment of Stuttering: A Preliminary Report of EMG Investigations.
109
  M.F. Dorman and R.J. Porter, Jr. Hemispheric Lateralization for Speech Perception in Stutterers.
117
  P.W. Nye, T.M. Nearey, and T.C. Rand. Dichotic Release from Masking: Further Results from Studies with Synthetic Speech Stimuli.
123
  Michael Kubovy, James E. Cutting, and Roderick McI. McGuire. Binaural Subjective Tones and Melodies Without Monaural Familiarity Cues.
139
  James E. Cutting and Burton S. Rosner. Categories and Boundaries in Speech and Music.
145
  James E. Cutting. Different Speech-Processing Mechanisms Can be Reflected in the Results of Discrimination and Dichotic Listening Tasks.
159
  P.W. Nye and J.H. Gaitenby. The Intelligibility of Synthetic Monosyllabic Words in Short, Syntactically Normal Sentences.
169
  Paul Mermelstein. A Phonetic-Context Controlled Strategy for Segmentation and Phonetic Labeling of Speech.
191
  Robert Verrbrugge, Winifred Strange, and Donald Shankweiler. What Information Enables a Listener to Map a Talker's Vowel Space?
199
  Winifred Strange, Robert Verbrugge, and Donald Shankweiler. Consonant Environment Specifies Vowel Identity.
209
  M.F. Dorman, Jame E. Cutting, and Lawrence J. Raphael. Identification of Vowel Order: Concatenated Versus Formant-Connected Sequences.
217
  Leigh Lisker. On "Explaining" Vowel Duration Variation.
225
  M.F. Dorman, D. Kewley-Port, S. Brady and M.T. Turvey. Two Processes in Vowel Recognition: Inferences from Studies of Backward Masking.
233
  Lawrence J. Raphael, Michael F. Dorman, Charles Tobin, and Frances Freeman. Vowel and Nasal Durations in Vowel-Nasal-Consonant Sequences in American English: Spectrographic Studies.
255
  Michael F. Dorman, Lawrence J. Raphael, Frances Freeman, and Charles Tobin. Vowel and Nasal Durations as Perceptual Cues to Voicing in Word-Final Stop Consonants.
263
II. Publications and Reports
273