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David Braze

photo of Dave Braze

Haskins Laboratories
300 George Street, Ste. 900
New Haven, CT 06511

Phone: (203) 865-6163 x241
Fax: (203) 865-8963
Email: dave.braze at haskinslabs.org


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Senior Scientist, Haskins Laboratories, member of Haskins Imaging Lab
PI, Individual Differences in Learning Potential for Language and Literacy [Full Text] [NIH RePORTER]

Investigator, Neurobehavioral Mechanisms in Reading Comprehension
Investigator, Nature and Acquisition of the Speech Code and Reading (project 1)

Adjunct Professor, Linguistics, University of Connecticut

Past Appointments


Visiting Professor, Psychology, Trinity College
Adjunct Professor, Psychology, Southern Connecticut State University
Lecturer, Linguistics, Yale University

Research

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I'm interested in the cognitive structures and processes that underlie the human ability to fluidly assemble compositional meaning from more-or-less novel strings of words. So, a central focus of my research is the question of how lexical, grammatical, semantic and pragmatic processes interact with one another to yield the apprehension meaning as encoded in the spoken and written word. My work is particularly focused on individual variation around 'typical' behavior and development of language skills, and cognition more generally.

Eye-tracking and fMRI are my methodological heavy guns. I've been using the technique of tracking eye-movements during reading for some time. It provides word-by-word indicators of processing load as a text is read. More recently, I've starting using the method of tracking eye-movements over 'visual worlds' to answer questions about the online comprehension of speech. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) lets us look at relationships between brain activity and cognitive capacities like reading skill or vocabulary size. I'm also very interested in instruments for conventional psychometric assessment as well as dynamic testing.

The Big Picture

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Psycholinguistics is concerned with characterizing the human capacity for language in both it's psychological and social contexts. A central goal of the language and cognitive sciences is to provide a theoretical account of the structures, capacities and processes that underlie language acquisition, including features of production and comprehension in each developmental state. This implies that a focus on language in its psychological aspect is primary. However, a complete theory must address language use in real communicative contexts. Moreover, we should be careful to consider language specific capacities within a broad cognitive framework. A complete theory must explain individual variation in linguistic ability, including both 'normal' variation and disordered language.

Community Outreach

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I am happy to talk with educators, or anyone else, about what we do. If you would like to learn more about our work, please contact me. I am available to make a presentation to your group, to host a visit to Haskins Labs, or just to chat about language, cognitive science or research.

Collaborators (past and present)

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Edited Volumes

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Brady, S., Braze, D., & Fowler, C. A. (Eds.). (2011). Explaining Individual Differences in Reading: Theory and Evidence. Psychology Press. [publisher]

Braze, D., Hiramatsu, K., & Kudo, Y., (Eds.). (1999). Cranberry Linguistics: University of Connecticut Working Papers in Linguistics v10. [publisher]

Papers and Chapters

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Clark, N. B., McRoberts, G. W., Van Dyke, J. A., Shankweiler, D. P., & Braze, D. (2012). Immediate memory for new words and phonological awareness are associated in adults and pre-reading children. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 26.7, 577-596. [publisher] [Haskins Archive PDF]

Katsika, A., D. Braze, A. Deo, and M.M. Piņango (2012). Mechanisms in Complement Coercion: Distinguishing Between Type-shifting and Pragmatic Inferencing. The Mental Lexicon, 7.1, 58-76. [publisher] [Haskins Archive PDF]

Braze, D., McRoberts G., & McDonough, C. (2011) Early Pre-cursors of Reading-relevant Skills: Implications for Differences in Phonological Awareness. In S. Brady, D. Braze & C. Fowler (Eds.). Explaining Individual Differences in Reading: Theory and Evidence. Psychology Press. [publisher] [Haskins Archive PDF]

Braze, D., Mencl, W. E., Tabor, W., Pugh, K. R., Constable, R. T., Fulbright, R. K., Magnuson, J. S., Van Dyke, J. A., & Shankweiler, D. P. (2011). Unification of Sentence Processing via Ear and Eye: An fMRI Study. Cortex, 47, 416-431. [PubMedCentral] [publisher] [Haskins Archive PDF]

Magnuson, J. S., Kukona, A., Braze, D., Johns, C. L., Van Dyke, J. A., Tabor, W., Mencl, W. E., Pugh, K. R. & Shankweiler, D. P. (2011). Phonological instability in young adult poor readers: Time course measures and computational modeling. In McCardle, P., Miller, B., Lee, R. J. & Tzeng, O. (eds.), Dyslexia Across Languages: Orthography and the Brain-Gene-Behavior Link. Baltimore, Maryland: Paul H. Brookes. [Haskins Archive PDF]

Magnuson, J. S., Kukona, A., Braze, D., Johns, C. L., Van Dyke, J. A., Tabor, W., Mencl, W.E., Pugh, K.R., & Shankweiler, D.P. (2010). Phonological instability in young adult poor readers. Proceedings of the 32nd annual conference of the Cognitive Science Society, 1429-1434. [publisher]

Shankweiler, D. P., Mencl, W. E., Braze, D., Tabor, W., Pugh, K. R., & Fulbright, R. K. (2008). Reading Differences and Brain: Cortical Integration of Speech and Print in Sentence Processing Varies with Reader Skill. Developmental Neuropsychology, 33.6 745-776. [abstract] [PubMed] [publisher] [Haskins Archive PDF]

Braze, D., Tabor, W., Shankweiler, D. P., & Mencl, W. E. (2007). Speaking up for Vocabulary: Reading Skill Differences in Young Adults. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 40.3, 226-243. [abstract] [PubMedCentral] [publisher] [Haskins Archive PDF]

Braze, D. 2004. Aspectual Inflection, Verb Raising, and Object Fronting in American Sign Language. Lingua, 114.1, 29-58. [PubMed] [publisher] [Haskins Archive PDF]

Braze, D., D. Shankweiler, W. Ni, & L. Palumbo. (2002). Readers’ Eye Movements Distinguish Anomalies of Form and Content. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, 31.1, 25-44. [PubMedCentral] [publisher] [Haskins Archive PDF]

Braze, D. (1999). Garden Path Sentences and Morphological Frequency Biases. Cranberry Linguistics (pp. 13-34). University of Connecticut Working Papers in Linguistics, v10. Storrs, CT. [PDF] [publisher]

Crain, S., Ni, W., Shankweiler, D. P., Conway, L., & Braze, D. (1996). Meaning, Memory and Modularity. Proceedings of the NELS 26 Sentence Processing Workshop (pp. 27-44). MIT Working Papers in Linguistics v9. Cambridge, MA. [abstract] [Haskins Archive PDF]

Manuscripts and Presentations

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McRoberts, G. W., & Braze, D. (under revision). The emergence of rhyme preference: implications for the development of phonological awareness. manuscript under review. Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT. [request ms.]

Fowler, C. A., Kolsteren, M., Rimzhim, A., O'Connor, P., Braze, D., van Hell, J., & Feldman, L. (under revision). Gradience in implementation of systematic processes of L1 in L2 foreign accent: Final devoicing in Dutch-accented English. manuscript under review. Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT.

Johns, C. L., D. Braze, P. J. Molfese, J. A. Van Dyke, D. Kush, J. S. Magnuson, W. Tabor, W. E. Mencl, H. R. Jones and D. P. Shankweiler (April 5, 2014). Structural MRI reveals correlations between individual differences in language-related cognitive abilities and thickness of language-relevant cortical areas. Boston, MA, Poster Presented at the 21st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society.

Sanchez-Alonzo, S., A. Ly, D. Braze, C. Lacadie, T. Constable and M. Pinango (March 13, 2014). The processing and neural basis of argument structure composition through eye-tracking, focal brain-lesion and fMRI. Columbus, Ohio, Poster Presented at the 27th Annual CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing.

Mencl, W. E., Braze, D., Di, X., Tabor, W., Pugh, K. R., & Shankweiler, D. (July, 2012). Cortical bases of individual differences in garden-path sentence processing. Talk given at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. Montreal, Canada.

Braze, D., Kukona, A., Tabor, W., Magnuson, J. S., Mencl, W. E., Kornilov, S., Van Dyke, J. A., Johns, C. & Shankweiler, D. (May, 2012). Individual differences in speech-driven gaze patterns in the visual world task. Talk given at the 6th Scandinavian Workshop on Applied Eye Tracking (SWAET). Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

McRoberts, G., & Braze, D. (June, 2012). The Emergence of Rhyme Preference. Poster presented at the XVIII Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies (ICIS). Minneapolis, Minnesota. [request ms.]

Kukona, A., Braze, D., Magnuson, J. S., Mencl, W. E., Pugh, K. R., Tabor, W., Van Dyke, J., and Shankweiler, D. (2011) Reader skill differences in rapid compositional semantic processing. Talk given at the 18th Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. St. Pete Beach, FL.

Braze, D., Kukona, A., Tabor, W., Magnuson, J. S., Mencl, W. E., Kornilov, S., Van Dyke, J. A., Johns, C. & Shankweiler, D. (2011, March 25). Variation in Visual World Performance is Related to Both Verbal and Visual Memory. Poster presented at the 24th CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing. Palo Alto, CA. [PDF]

Shankweiler, D.P., Van Dyke, J., Braze, D., Fulbright, R.K., Mencl, W.E., Pugh, K., & Tabor, W. (2010, July 8). Tracking the supramodal language brain in skilled adult readers. Talk given at the Seventeenth Annual Conference of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. Berlin, Germany. [request slides]

Magnuson, J. S., Kukona, A., Braze, D., Johns, C., Van Dyke, J., Tabor, W., Mencl, W. E., Pugh, K. R., & Shankweiler, D. (2010, January). Simulating Acquisition and Deficits in Human and Computer Models. Talk given at The Dyslexia Foundation "Extraordinary Brain" Symposium. Taipei, Taiwan. [request slides]

Shankweiler, D. P., Braze, D., Mencl, W. E., Tabor, W., Pugh, K. R., Constable, R. T., Fulbright, R. K., Magnuson, J. S., & Van Dyke, J. A. (2009, October 15). Cerebral convergence of sentence processing in speech and reading: Effects of differences in reading skill. Poster presented at the 1st Neurobiology of Language Conference. Chicago, IL. [PDF]

Braze, D., Kukona, A., Magnuson, J. S., Mencl, W. E., Pugh, K. R., Tabor, W., Van Dyke, J. A., & Shankweiler, D. P. (2009, June 26). Vocabulary makes an independent contribution to reading comprehension in young adults' reading skills. Poster presented at the Sixteenth Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. Boston, MA. [abstract] [PDF]

Braze, D., & McRoberts, G. W. (2008, July 9). The Early Development Of Phonological Sensitivity And Implications For Differences In Phonological Awareness. Talk given at the pre-conference symposium of the Fifteenth Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. Asheville, NC. [abstract]

Braze, D., Mencl, W.E., Shankweiler, D.P., Tabor, W. & Schultz, A. (2006, July 6). Skill-Related Differences in the Online Reading Behavior of Young Adults: Evidence from Eye-Movements. Talk given at the Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. Vancouver, Canada. [abstract] [PDF]

Braze, D., Mencl, W. E., Tabor, W., & Shankweiler, D. P. (2005). Speaking up for Vocabulary: Reading Skill Differences in Young Adults. Talk given at the Twelfth Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. Toronto, Ontario. (See Braze et al., 2007, Journal of Learning Disabilities)

Braze, D., Shankweiler, D. P., & Tabor, W. (2004). Individual Differences in Processing Anomalies of Form and Content. Poster presented at the 17th CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing. College Park, MD. [PDF]

Braze, D. (2003). The Role of Experience in Sentence Acceptability and Sentence Processing. Poster presented at the 16th CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing. Boston, MA. [PDF]

Braze, D., Ni, W., & Shankweiler, D. P. (2001). The Parser Distinguishes Anomalies of Form and Content. Poster presented at the 14th Annual CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing. Philadelphia, PA. [PDF]

Jobs

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Grad & Undergraduate Student Internships: Work and Learn in our Lab

There is no better way to learn about cognitive neuroscience, experimental psycholinguistics or literacy research than by doing it. If you are a student looking for a challenging internship we'd like to hear from you. Skills that are valued in our lab range from basic computer literacy (wordprocessor, spreadsheet or slideshow), to programming and scripting (python, matlab, R), to graphic arts (traditional or computer-based), and beyond. No matter what your background may be, if you are enthusiastic, willing to learn and to contribute, we may be able to find a place for you. Email or call.